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French Onion Soup Gratinée

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French Onion Soup Gratinée              Makes: 12 portions

(Professional Cooking, 7th Edition)

INGREDIENTS                                                                           

2 oz. Butter

2½ lb. Onions, sliced thin

1.    Heat the butter in a stockpot over moderate heat. Add the onions and cook until golden. Stir occasionally. Note: The onions must cook slowly and become evenly browned. This is a slow process and will take about 30 min.  Do not brown too fast or use high heat.

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3 ¼ qt. Beef stock, or half beef and half chicken stock

Salt to taste

Pepper to taste

1-2 fl. oz. Sherry (optional)

 2.   Add stock and bring to a boil. Simmer until the onions are very tender and the flavors are well blended , about 20 min.

3.   Season to taste with salt and pepper. Add the sherry if desired.

4.   Keep the soup hot until ready for service.

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French bread, as needed

¾ lb. Gruyère or Swiss cheese or a mixture of both; coarsely grated

5.  Cut the bread into slices about 3/8 inch thick. You will need 1 or 2 slices per portion, or just enough to cover the top of the soup in its individual serving crocks or ramekins.

6. Toast bread slices in the oven or under the broiler.

For each portion: fill an individual-service soup crock or ramekin with hot soup. Place 1 or 2 slices of toast on top and cover with cheese. Pass under the broiler until the cheese is bubbling and lightly browned. Serve immediately.

Variations

Onion soup may be served without gratinéeing and with cheese croutons prepared separately. Toast the bread as in the basic recipe above.

Place on sheet pan. Brush lightly with butter and sprinkle each piece with grated cheese. (Parmesan may be mixed with the other cheese). Brown under the broiler. Garnish each portion with 1 cheese crouton.

This method is less expensive because it uses much less cheese.

  (Photo: Professional Cooking, 7th Edition)

 

 

 

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